Aging and Age-Related Diseases of the Ocular Lens and Vitreous Body [Special Issue]

Reduced quality of life and financial burden due to visual impairment and blindness begin to increase dramatically when individuals reach the age of 40. The major causes of age-related vision loss can be traced to changes to the structure and function of the lens, one of the tissues responsible for focusing light on the retina. Age-related nuclear cataracts, which are caused by aggregation and condensation of proteins, diminish vision because they impede the transmission and focusing of light on the retina. In addition to the slow-developing age-related form, cataracts often develop rapidly as a complication of ocular surgery, such as following vitrectomy or as a consequence of vitreous gel degeneration. Posterior capsular opacification, which can develop following cataract removal, is cau…